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Monthly Archives: February 2016

WILD HORSES, PZP, DEFORMITIES, AND DEATH; American Public has a lot of question about the Pesticide PZP that need answered! Editorial

foal“If our government continues to look for solutions in the area of manipulated science, special interest needs, and technology only, rather than establish Ecological Zones for the habitat and wildlife as a priority, the result will be to worsen the situation.” — John Cox, when discussing Ecological Zones as Eco-Reserves for Public Use and Education and the Tragedy of the Commons

The process of learning is tremendous. Doors open when the Truth involved. We are now finding many questions, in the matters of PZP Pesticide use – results of the pesticide on horses as well as surrounding wildlife. The information involves the BLM and the Department of the Interior and simply bad science from 1994 to the present, in the matters of the experimental Pesticide PZP.

BLM employees and administrators refuses to answer, and are not answering pertinent questions, but previous employees are talking, and more will talk — and research of photos taken in the Nevada Desert show questions must be answered, sooner than later. They speak of neglect to record the happenings and developments directly involved in PZP use, and how Administrators simply refused to develop, or did not develop pertinent records, a situation to actually show the public the real long-term results of PZP used on America’s Wild Horses!

IT IS DIFFICULT TO HIDE THE TRUTH FOR LONG

Now we see results such as the more well known, and of course less hidden, wild horses in South Caroline – but merely the tip of the hidden truth of PZP. It was known by a few, but those few said nothing — the researchers knew as well – Coverup? Obviously! Cowhands in the Oregon and Nevada deserts find many of the bones of foals and yearlings as well, deformed. . . PZP usage? Who knows for sure, with known corrupt government agencies such as the BLM, will the truth ever be told?

We also started looking at the Wild Horse Bone-Pile photos found at bottom of cliffs, once again and due to this information. Yes, there exists many bone piles at the base of cliffs in remote areas of Nevada and eastern Oregon. The BLM involved? Have they ever admitted to such? Of course not, it is an atrocity, but the piles there, or were before we brought the subject up a couple of years ago –

BLM Police nor any other investigative agency looked into the matter, nor did they look into the matters of Inventory Lists where Wild Horses disappeared from the range – that taxpayer’s paid private contractors $345 million (cost of roundups by private contractors of wild horses that disappeared only – vouchers were paid), are these part of that inventory of horses that disappeared? Who knows why or how, as no one investigated.

Anyway, when looking at close-ups, we see many deformed bones, both foals and mares and older stallions – we assumed for the past years simply another tact, BLM running wild horses off cliffs perhaps, mainly for their sick amusement, and promoted a more efficient method of killing Wild Horses when no one around – but now we discover even more reasoning behind the genocide . . . Will we ever know for sure?

So smoothly BLM and science contractors, together, made the transition, basically of researchers not speaking about the Pesticide PZP in public. Instead, they gathered BLM supporters and what they call BLM Assets (did you wonder why, ever?) that were, and remain, very ignorant in the matters of science, and were sold facts that never had to do with the actuality, but rather the misinformation and lie about PZP (i.e. included much more sales than science). Mainly, people that never knew enough to ask the proper questions, and naïve enough to pass the bogus information on to other horse advocates and the public as well – A well known and highly promoted government tactic when coverup involved. . .

A MORITORIUM NEEDED RIGHT NOW ON PZP AND ITS USE

Government at its very worst, and private contractor’s at the shallowest and worst – Again! No one surprised, but now they need to stop using the PZP, as we discover more information, and on situations such as this, weekly discoveries, of course, will develop. But a Wild Horse Overpopulation on Public Lands – It remains as big of a lie as it was yesterday, the week before that, and the decades before that!

First, BLM and their Supporters, will attempt the condescending remarks toward those discussing the information and coverup – as they do currently toward those who disfavor the use of PZP – yes, BLM employees involved and mustering up numbers of people, such as pro-slaughter people, and even naïve horse advocates that know better, but become involved anyway – and promote fairy tales of assisting wild horses, but they are not and do not – just another part of the BLM scheme;

BLM employees will then refuse to discuss questions, and discuss the falsified Over-Population of Wild Horses to the Public, and insist Overpopulation exists, by their numbers – percentages actually that are developed from a falsified premise and placed into their computer templates to falsify the wild horse herd numbers even more so – yes, they have been caught previously as well;

The BLM followers and supporters will Rant and Rave about PZP being safe, and request more money, via donations, to remain supporting PZP, or some will even ask, ironically bold, for donations to investigate;

Then we will hear more appalling truth about the pesticide PZP, and the actual nightmare-results it gave to mares and foals over the long-term situation, we will hear more about deformities of foals, and yearlings or older, toward their slow and sickly death – does BLM employees care? Not really, just less horses they have to deal with, at least in their minds;

Then we will hear about the harmful effects about Wildlife in all the areas where PZP used previously, and why, for example, the Apex Predators no longer exist in many of those areas, or are quickly becoming extinct within those same areas – PZP death toll perhaps mounts – but hey, according to BLM employees, no records, no one there, so why say anything, why not just not say anything, and when asked just lie. If it sounds like business as usual at the corrupt agency, BLM, and DOI repeating the lies, it is unequivocally , Business as Usual at these government agencies – and they wonder why their reputation is so bad.

Then eventually and quietly PZP will simply be shelved, again, for a later date by this totally corrupt government agency, the BLM . . .

SO THESE QUESTIONS PREVAIL:

Why is there no long-term scientific data for PZP?

Was there a coverup in the deserts of Nevada, and in Eastern Oregon – Burns District and Klamath Falls District, with deformities in foals not recorded? We do have people talking from the range, so BLM is going to have to answer these questions honestly – or they will attempt the end-around-maneuver, and ramble and misinform, as usual —

At deformed foal sites, and PZP mares, who mysteriously died at wildlife/predator sites (not from predator attack), and wildlife dead as well, why was it not recorded?

Why were sickly mares, and foals not recorded years after the mares and PZP used, and found dead, foals deformed?

Why have there been no studies to show the effects of this Pesticide PZP within Ecological Zones and on Wildlife — as the EPA documents make it quite clear, and repeatedly, it remains stated an UNKNOWN — ?

More questions are involved, but this is a good start – perhaps this government agency will become transparent, as should be done anyway to America’s taxpayers and who pay their wages and retirement? Or, tell the truth? Aw, never mind, that’s not going to happen in the near future until our representatives make them transparent, and make them tell the truth!

The realm of irresponsibility, within not only the research, but its use by a government agency, and so much that is UNKNOWN about this particular Pesticide, overwhelms its use — America Demands its USE TO BE STOPPED UNTIL FURTHER INVESTIGATION!  IGNORANCE IS NOT AND NEVER HAS BEEN AN EXCUSE TO USE SUCH PROFOUND PESTICIDES ON OUR WILDLIFE — EVER!

___________________________

As time move forward, we discover many more things of a negative attribute in the matters of Pesticide PZP, but below we can directly connect this problem with the problem above — but confirmation unavailable, as they euthanized the foal before blood or tests completed to see if Pesticide enhanced or involved in the situation — one thing we know for sure, the researchers were involve and can speculate, truthfully, they did not want the foal tested — Why?  Read below:

SHARE! The old hypothesis — that PZP merely blocks sperm attachment — has been disproved.

By Marybeth Devlin, Wild Horse Advocate & member of Protect Mustangs

Kaur & Prabha (2014) found that the infertility brought on by PZP is ” … a consequence of ovarian dystrophy rather than inhibition of sperm-oocyte interaction.” They reported that PZP’s antibodies induce ovarian dystrophy, oophoritis (inflammation of the ovaries), destruction of oocytes in all growing follicles, and depletion of resting follicles.

Despite all the hype about PZP being non-hormonal, the manufacturer himself knew that it had an adverse hormonal effect — significantly-lowered estrogen. In 1992, he reported that ” … three consecutive years of PZP treatment may interfere with normal ovarian function as shown by markedly depressed oestrogen secretion.” Thus, PZP is an endocrine disruptor.

Worse yet, Sacco et al. (1981) found that PZP antibodies are transferred from mother to young via the placenta and milk. The transferred antibodies cross-react with and bind to the zonae pellucidae of female offspring. This is bad news because BLM regularly administers PZP to pregnant and lactating mares, who transfer the destructive antibodies to their filly-foals. Thus, the fillies get their first treatment with PZP in utero, while nursing, or both.

Nettles (1997) found an association between PZP and stillbirths. READ MORE here: http://protectmustangs.org/?p=9042

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Posted by on February 29, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

America’s Wild Horses, Wildlife, Buffalo, and Whales

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“Non-Humane actions are not and never will be America’s tradition nor heritage.” – John Cox

Today, we are being led to believe both ranching and trapping to be traditional – to be respected because of heritage, as well. Oddly, we see both institutions’ doing things destructively, both today and throughout history. Their actions are and remain obvious, without oversite or regulatory controls in place, and not only quite destructive (undebatable) but which we cannot deny any longer.

The same ol’ tale that seems to aggressively want to prevail over a lot of the ongoing environmental and wildlife being destroyed today – especially within our environment, our Public lands, and America’s wildlife and wild horses alike. . . apparently is their reasoning for expansion.

History is also quite clear, both trapping and ranching a product of industrialization, and that’s all; simply peruse a little history and it is quite clear – and as we can all agree, that industrialization as we know it today, and led to believe no other options exist, remains quite destructive. Options do exist!

Colonization of North America by Europeans began in the early 1600s. Of course, as history notes quite often, we then assumed this started the “Real History” in America. Yes, we can be repugnantly ignorant, shown throughout history to be such – probably why comedy, and satire, so popular – because those who understand this arrogance can also laugh at our human downfalls, in the awesome attempts to correct such behaviors.

The United States was founded by loosely understanding the concept of our natural environment, and its use. But the low population of humans at that time presented no disastrous outcome of our wildlife; which was not until our industrial economy, and at the same time the beginning of an extreme population growth – expansion.

“Much of the continent, especially the western regions, was settled during this transitional time period. In contrast, Native Americans were living in hunter-gatherer or horticultural societies at the time of European colonization and American expansion. The clashes between these two cultures had tragic consequences for the Native Americans and also resulted in dramatic declines in wildlife. The 20th century roughly corresponds with the transition of North America to a late industrial economy.”

Not surprisingly, a dramatic shift in the attitudes toward nature and the development of the conservation movement occurred during that time. The examples of the history of bison and beaver show us quite clearly that it was a change for the worse – the corporate industrial complex, and human population escalated simultaneously.

The roll of Illusory Superiority (the study of which not started until 1991 and explained in a previous blog) established, and human’s more blatant than ever before in history, undeniably took upon themselves, ignorantly, the role of judge and executioner of our wildlife, mostly for money, well all of it for money actually – sell outs – the term hunter-gatherer, in this writers’ perspective, changed to an almost Pleistocene era human-nature (i.e. see Pleistocene Over Kill Theory) – and as growth occurred, the wildlife become less, then less again, in both stature and population.

CULTURAL ANIMAL

“Species, in general, are primarily able to survive and reproduce due to biological adaptations that result from eons of natural selection and biological evolution. The cultural adaptations of humans have allowed them to colonize nearly every ecosystem type on Earth. In addition, cultural innovations have allowed the human population to grow exponentially for millennia. Such sustained population growth is unparalleled by any other species on the planet.”

The population of a typical species grows until it reaches the carrying capacity of its environment, then levels off or declines. In other words, it grows until it is fully utilizing the available resources, such as food and space. Nature upholds its strategy for keeping this type of situation in-check and through many natural occurrences of necessity – when nature allowed to fulfill its course of action.

If wild horses, for example, were in truth overpopulated on our Public Lands, we would be observing much different circumstances on our Public Lands, and directly associated with an overpopulation of wild horses. It does not exist.

The same is true with our wolf populations in America’s forests and mountains. The fact is we are not seeing any of the values that show us overpopulation of either species as being even close to being overpopulated in any areas of the United States. Although, what we do see, and observe quite readily, is the facts that do promote an overpopulation of livestock, mainly cattle, on America’s Public Lands. As well, we are consistently and daily seeing the destruction of our Public Lands by an over abundant amount of grazing and trampling our Public Lands presently.

“Currently the global human population is large enough” (authors note: yes, we continue to outgrow our natural environment) “and the technologies that allow humans to manipulate the environment are potent enough, that human-caused alterations to the biosphere are causing the extinction of way too many indigenous wildlife species. If present trends continue, there will be an eventual crash in the human population that will bring great suffering and cause widespread environmental damage. This is the root cause of the modern environmental crisis.”

ATTITUDE AND NATURE

“Each type of society is generally associated with certain types of social conditions and attitudes toward wildlife and nature. This way of organizing and describing this situation comes from a sub-discipline of anthropology called Human Ecology, which seeks to understand humans by how they interact with the natural world and with each other in order to survive (Richardson et al. 1996).” IMG_0494-450x300

This is essentially the way that ecologists understand other organisms, so Human Ecology fundamentally sees humans as another species of large social mammal living in the biosphere, while still recognizing their incredible uniqueness as cultural animals.

It may also provide some clues about how our global culture needs to change if it is to create a sustainable world in the future. Never the less it is Natural Selection, most of which we are destroying daily due to our industrialized mind set, or our ironic attitude toward accepting the destruction for awkward at best excuses, often cloaked within tradition or heritage, even though untrue – aren’t excuses odd, seemingly innocent, but in reality, extremely deadly!

BELIEFS AND ATTITUDES TOWARD NATURE AND WILDLIFE

Societies largely rely upon controlling and manipulating ecosystems to procure food, rather than on interacting with natural ecosystems and wildlife. We blatantly ignore interaction, in order to maintain our industrialized positioning in the world. We function ON DEMANDS and death follows most often, not on wholesome nor positive interactions what so ever.

In fact, particularly in the western religions, consistent attempts to assert that humans’ superior to animals, and that it was God’s will that humans fully utilize the natural world for their own benefit (Warren 2003). The wilderness is often considered a bad, evil place, and taming wilderness for farms and killing wild animals, throughout history, as much a moral act as an economically beneficial situation (Snyder 1990), so the arrogant ignorance prevails and continues

“There were also active attempts by different religions in the west to suppress the practice of the more animistic and nature-oriented horticultural and hunter-gatherer religions, although we still practice the vestiges of old European pagan rituals during Christian holidays in the west today, such as Easter bunnies, Easter eggs and Christmas trees. It might be fair to say that late agrarian religions often have an “otherworldliness” quality to them, especially in the west (Wilber 2000). The school of Ecophilosophy asserts that the corresponding lack of sacredness in nature and the material world helped fuel the environmental destruction that accompanies this form of society (Wilber 1996, Gottlieb 1996).”

The fact is, and very troubling at times when defining a more established Humane Principle, that America, within a generalized context, has been completely modified for human food production. The high population densities of our culture, also requires firewood and timber, so it is not uncommon to see deforestation for firewood (and resultant accelerated erosion of hillsides and other catastrophic situations) in history as well as today.

But one situation does promote another within our industrial landscape. For example, hills associated with the removal of forests over thousands of years, is followed by erosion of soils and intensive grazing by cattle and other livestock – totally acceptable by our industrialized society and in the name of population over-load. Yes, the sacrifices for grazing continues today, keeping the hills in a perpetual state of biological poverty and low productivity. Ironically, today we see 31% of beef products, for example, i.e. approximately 9.892 lbs. billion pounds of beef, being thrown-away as being a non-sale item within the commercial markets – so many questions arise from this situation alone – or should.

Interesting that within our society as it is today, it is quite possible for a person in our society to live their entire life and have little or no direct contact with either natural or agricultural ecosystems.

Different segments of society hold different attitudes toward nature and wildlife in early industrial societies. The new market-based industrial economy viewed wildlife and other products from natural ecosystems as goods to be sold on the open market. The result was the rapid plundering of wildlife by market-hunting, particularly in the western hemisphere (Warren 2003). This rapid plunder was aided by the attitudes toward wilderness as being “evil” or purely for human use, which were held over from the agrarian religious worldview.

Levels of organization in ecology: emergent properties.

  • Populations are interbreeding groups of individuals of the same species, generally living in the same contiguous habitat.
  • Communities are interacting populations of different species.
  • Ecosystems are comprised of both the biotic (living) and abiotic (non-living) factors in a given area; they contain both the broad biological community and all the physical processes (such as weather, soil, hydrology, nutrients, energy flow etc.) that influence that community.
  • The biosphere is global in scale, and includes all the biological and physical processes that allow for and influence life on Earth.
  • Higher scales of organization contain smaller scales (e.g., a given community contains populations of various species), yet all scales also possess properties that are unique to that scale and that cannot be deduced from properties of included scales. For example, the nature and strength of interactions among two species of meadow mice cannot be fully explained even with the most sophisticated models of their population dynamics. Thus, many interactions at the community level are emergent properties of communities.

It is easy to see how the intense exploitation of wildlife for markets historically, and currently, reflect the view that nature is separate from humans. . . “However, even the appreciation of natural places for their beauty, as reflected in 19th Century landscape paintings, contained the subtle message that humans are separate from nature.

In fact, the entire concept on looking at a “pretty view” in a natural landscape did not exist in the West until approximately the 17th century, and is attributed by social scientists to the increasing psychological separation between humans and nature (Tuan 1982).”

Many people, today, see nature and wildlife within a separate reality context, as well. Landscape photography and wildlife photography, actually remains a total disconnect in reality. Substantial belief of those realms where the photos or paintings captured indeed remain dangerous, and especially unavailable for the normal human to adventure into; and to actually see wildlife?

Well, for many it is better, and much safer, to see on television, in the movies, or within one’s very safe living room. Those dangerous animals, safe to watch the drama unfold on television, as the orator becomes systematically dramatic in the fact of danger; of a separate universe, or worse, death to the average human who would have the audacity of vanity to wonder into the depths of deep, dark, nature.

If you listen closely, the oration sexual in communication, drawing one into foreplay, then into convergence, to a rhythmic pace deeper into . . . and almost at the height of . . . go to — a commercial for detergent, a new sexy car, insurance, or perfume (in the past, the 50’s and sixties, it was a cigarette commercial most often).

Interesting how the complex attitudes toward nature developed during the early industrial era, one can state they were all influenced by increasing the separation of people from nature; thereby, the livelihoods and daily activities of most people in industrial areas required little to even no direct contact with natural ecosystems, wildlife, or plants.

The demand of market-economics for wildlife continued to grow until wildlife populations driven extinct, or to very low population densities, as we see today and many nearly extinct currently.

The best example is the tough leather of American bison hides, which made good belts for industrial machines in the Eastern US. It was the commercial hunting, ultimately, that drove them to near extinction. We experience the same with Ivory today, with minks, with wolves, otter, bobcats, and many other wildlife. The trappers sell the fur to Broker’s and for fur coats, coat collars, or with wolves, bobcats, leopards, lions, or bears, etc., skin-out the entire hide and use as one would hang a painting in living rooms and place on the walls, or as rugs.

IT IS ESTIMATED CURRENTLY that 52% of America’s wildlife killed (i.e. since 2000 GAO records/reports 1.2 million per year to 5.8 million per year)! This is wildlife killed for commercialized or other unnecessary situations for our industrialized commercial culture – then we get to the commercialization of animals, an entirely separate situation, and find millions more killed yearly, to supply food product.

Within our industrial society we currently make the distinction between domestic murder of animals as useful and required, and the necessity of the murder of America’s wildlife being too wild and saving them (i.e. a conflict here within both excuses, but true all the same – excuses are often very crazy and obvious) from starvation or overpopulation and destruction of our wild lands!

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Oddly, due to tradition or heritage terminology, which supports the killing to near extinction, or to extinction, or abusively, or psychotically, it is our very disconnect, both from the term HUMANE PRINCPLE or ETHICS very much accomplished, and unreasonable. Here we can use the Wild Horses as an example and quite well, and the terms of overpopulation, of potential starvation in the wilds (a term to appeal to domestic horses that require feeding – which, simultaneously disconnect the wild nature of wild horses and their ability and nature to find graze and browse themselves, who in reality take care of themselves quite well in their natural surroundings, but in terms only overlooked just the same, and often). Yes, Humane Reasoning also defiled at this point, due to the nature of the excuse being so unreasonable that it must be true – television commercials do this extensively —

The fact is this — Humane regulation are needed on market-based exploitation of natural populations to prevent species loss, or simply discontinued – as necessity here is extremely questionable at best. Many of the first environmental laws passed during this era addressed market-hunting. Due to the loss of so much wildlife in the United States, between 2000 and 2016, common sense tells us these situations of market sustainability no longer exist, and the markets should cease immediately.

CONSERVATION AND BIODIVERSITY

Conservation biologists face the ultimate problem in conservation: “. . . the rates of extinction far surpass those of the most apocalyptic mass extinctions our planet has ever experienced (Ward 2004).”

Under human domination, our planet is becoming a biologically impoverished image of the world that supported humanity in past generations. Yes, and it led us up to our becoming industrialized, and something happened – something happened to our mind-set – something destructive – and something that seemed to allow us the types of abuse or types of killing that were unacceptable to us just decades before – and our imagination could define and create reason to justify the very nature and amount of abuse and death, commercially, to be okay.

We can no longer thrill to the sight of waves of migrating passenger pigeons, hordes of bison, perhaps the view of a wild horse herd interacting within their natural environment – and not just a photo but the real-deal, or the splashing of salmon in many rivers.

We are a powerful biological entity. We are making choices that will influence humanity for centuries to come, not to mention the Earth’s biota, even after we have gone. We can now perhaps define our existence; we may not exist in a few decades. Oddly, and seemingly acceptable to many, is the fact all of this survival is not predicated upon our knowledge of science or survival instinct, but on our very ignorance of ignoring our necessity for survival, and the survival of generations to come, as if to say: Who cares anyway? Well, a lot of us care – there’s more to life in a long term necessity for life, rather than the short term gain or profit margin, which exists today!

What will exist in the future will largely be a result Our Actions, of the actions we take today. We are the problem; can we be part of the solution, and set aside the ignorance, the aggressive industrialist, terms that confuse issues, and do the right things for survival?

Conservation Biology is a discipline that is attempting to find ways to make humanity more compatible with wildlife and wild ecosystems, using the best available science. It is a crisis discipline that is under-funded and under-appreciated. This is because its practitioners are mainly advisors and the real solutions are political.

CONCLUSION

The American people are justifiably proud of their record in protecting wild areas and species through governmental action. It is significant that there has been no ground-breaking legislation, however, since the early 1970s, when Republican Richard Nixon was President. Despite the popularity of our parks, monuments, and refuges and despite a public that consistently supports strong environmental laws, there has been a distinct down-turn in protection of endangered species and habitats in the last decade. It is hard to be optimistic when we see enormous economic interests pitted against the under-funded agencies and private organizations dedicated to the salvation of species. In the long run, species preservation will depend on us changing our life styles and making sure there continues to be room on this planet for all species – as all ARE Connected – our very life on this planet is on the line here, and ignorance simply needs to go away, and intelligent decisions, based on sound science, and then based on sound reasoning and common sense, with LIFE AS A PRIORITY, WHICH UPHOLDS HUMANE VALUES AND PRINCIPLES, IS VERY NEEDED – RIGHT NOW!

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Endangered Species Technical Bulletin. June 1989. U.S. bans ivory imports for protection of the African elephant. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington D.C. Vol., XIV. 6:1-6.

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Flannery, T. 2001. The Eternal Frontier: an Ecological History of North America and Its People. Grove Press, New York.

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Posted by on February 21, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

Wild Horses, Wildlife, and Good Science

photo_bushyparkdeer1_stephendarlington

Thomas Kuhn (1963) points out that the history of science suggests that when a theory confronts an anomaly or a paradox, the resolution will be a new paradigm that transcends what went before.

My purpose is not to establish where science originated, but reconcile to the fact of how significant science is for our very life within today’s cultural evolution, whether we understand it or not.  But also, the travesty that exists or paradox, within accepting something, of which the denial could destroy us entirely – and how this would become an acceptable situation?

Ignorance has developed and overwhelmed our nation’s wildlife, our environment, as well as our nation’s Iconic Symbols — America’s Wild Horses — This serves us well right here, to show the horrific condition our cultural evolution of some people and what some people consider their priority, or lack of priority what so ever . . .

Then we have the hunter-gatherer syndrome, where even in pre-historic times, as far as we can surmise, develop into a paradox.  Hunter-gatherer’s were dominated by superstitions and irrational beliefs, as they are today as a matter of fact.  Then as now, they acted upon exceedingly limited information.  Much of their information wrong.  But why discuss such a thing, as ignorance?

Global Warming

In “Our Choice, A Plan to Solve the Climate Crisis,” Al Gore maintained, “. . . our capacity to respond quickly when our survival is at stake is often limited to the kinds of threats our ancestors survived: snakes, fires, attacks by other humans, and other tangible dangers in the here and now.  Global warming does not trigger those types of automatic responses. . .  As a result, the automatic and semiautomatic brain responses that have ensured our survival over the millennia are uniquely unsuited to the role of motivating new behaviors and patterns necessary to solve the climate crisis (i.e. Gore, 2009, pp 303-304).

Through history we see conflicts of intelligence, where we assumed things sacrificed, that were perhaps not.  Now we enter into the realms of wild horses, of our nation’s wildlife and the profound “kill Off” of 52% of our wildlife here in America; ironically, as federal and state wildlife management goes about their business as if it never occurred, and everything is just fine.  Well, everything is NOT just fine!

Michael Shermer, in Scientific America, August 2008, explains “. . . why thinking anecdotally comes naturally but thinking scientifically does not . . . superstition and belief in magic are millions of years old, whereas science . . . is only a few hundred years old.”

So the question again develops into a somewhat testimony of human-kind, in the matters of having the capacity to solve scientific problems — such as global warming, wild horses on Public Lands rather than extinction, killing our necessary and natural wildlife until all extinct; then to resolve these scientific problems, all in time to avert catastrophic and mindless destruction.

Our Culture

Interestingly, in a white paper,” Can a collapse of global civilization be avoided?” Paul and Anne Ehrlich (2013), claims that: “Until very recently, our ancestors had no reason to respond genetically or culturally to long term issues . . .  genetic and cultural selection were not creating brains or institutions capable of looking generations ahead; there would have been no selection pressures in that direction.  Indeed, quite the opposite . . . to keep perception of our environmental background steady so that rapid changes (e.g. leopard approaching) would be obvious.”

So, explanation in order.  We have government agencies, as we find when speaking with many of the personnel, that simply not only appear unqualified, but indeed are unqualified.  Many of these personnel, it seems clear, cannot make appropriate decisions within the scope of America’s wild horse safety and proper management, or proper management of our nation’s wildlife, and many other situations, to include Global Warming.

So with special interests aside, the incompetence and bungling of simple tasks simply become more and more involved through coverup, than actually involving science and preferred deductive reasoning toward a resolution.  As I have stated in many other articles, America, we have a Problem!  And now, all life on this planet needs Science to resolve long-term situations – but how long is long-term currently?  Well, according to good science, perhaps not long at all.  But, do we have the capacity for a resolution?

Wild Horse and Wildlife Resolution

As I stated previously, our problem can be stated clearly – Profoundly — Acceptable Ignorance has taken over America!  This must stop!  Now!  We simply do not have the time for more of such unfounded behavior.  Good decisions and correct choices must be made, and science is and remains the very basis for these such extremely significant decisions needed right now.  Frankly, our future depends on good decisions.  Bottom Line!  If the meat industry, for example, is the main problem for our declining environment, then the necessity of survival of this planet, compared to less profit must be of Priority.

So here we can get back to our cultural framing, the arts, storytelling, science, traditions, and truthful heritage.  Within the same context, what is required now is a high degree of science, or what is termed truthful science.  It becomes important here to understand, it is not necessary for everyone to become an intellectual, and of phenomenal brain-power.  But it does become important for the right choices to be made, and from good research, good data gathering, good fundamental perception of the data, and perhaps theories proven, checked and rechecked – all this for our survival.  Ignorance no longer palatable nor acceptable.  Ignorance need not apply!

Conclusion

This is not an easy subject to understand fully.  In the words of Edward O. Wilson (1998) who maintains that today the greatest divide within humanity is not the races, or religions, or even between the literate and the illiterate.  It is, he says, the chasm that separatejohn cams and vids maps tables scientific from pre-scientific cultures.

So yes, science is dependable.  Tradition and heritage back this up, as well as the ability to walk into a room and simply flip-on a light, turn on the heater in the winter, and heat up a cup of hot chocolate on the stove, surrounded by the mathematical wizardry of science, or what we refer to as our home.

Science has involved a continuous process of evolutionary growth for more than a hundred thousand years – but we forget and content in creating our own heritage (excuse to kill or excuse to not accept a truth e.g. the true number of wildlife remaining domestically, or wild horses roaming free on our Public Lands), don’t we, rather than the well proven, the reinforced time and time again – good science, natural selection, and nature running its course of life.

Recognizing the continuity of science through time and across cultures means that science should become an inherent part of our cultural heritage – it among other situations of responsibility as well as proper decision making, will save our planet –

Science is meant for all, and meant to be global in its aspects of cultural necessity.  Science is as much an innate ability of humans as is language, storytelling, poetry, music and art – all an indispensable part of what makes us human.

Time to renew the actual meaning of our Humane Principles, after all, it is what affects us – ALL IS CONNECTED – yes, humans, animals, and our environment alike – We must find the common resolution that we all can live with and live together, as we are all connected, and destruction of one is the destruction of us all and our world, as well.

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2016 in Uncategorized